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What Do Measles Look Like?

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Fred Hamill Profile
Fred Hamill answered
Measles look like a rash on the skin. Measles, also known as rubeola, is a viral infection of the skin. It is one of the most easily spread contagious diseases. In fact more than 85 percent of measles cases are attributed to tiny droplets that are spewed into the air, whenever a person coughs or sneezes. Once infected, a person contracts the illness after a week or two. The most vulnerable period for the illness to spread is 3-5 days before the symptoms appear and 4 days after the rashes begin to form.

The illness begins with a person contracting fever and a runny nose characterized by occasional cough. After a few days, there are rashes which appear around the mouth area, in the form of little white dots that resemble grains of sand on a rosy bump. Also known as Koplik's spots, this kind of formation are distinctive of the measles infection. A couple of days later, rashes begin to sprout. It appears in the form of a distinctive progression beginning from the head, face, neck, to the abdominal region and then along to the arms and legs. The rash which initially looks like reddish flat patches soon begins to acquire a bumpy form, creating an itchy sensation. When the rash appears, the fever escalates too. The rash lasts for five days, then it turns brown and the skin affected becomes dry.

A measles rash typically has a red or red/brown appearance. The rash is blotchy, too, and will generally start to show on the forehead first. Once it has started it will then spread across the face downwards, and head towards the neck and the rest of the body. It eventually reaches the arms and feet to create an all-over body rash. It is incredibly uncomfortable and is easily noticeable given the unique nature of the rash.

Measles is also known as rubeola and is an incredibly contagious and dangerous infection of the respiratory organs. It is caused by a virus that is spread through contact and the air. The virus causes a total-body skin rash, which is outlined above, as well as severe flu-like symptoms in its victims. It will cause a cough, a runny nose and a fever. Despite being a relatively rare disease in the United States, there are around 20 million cases of it every day throughout the rest of the world.

Given that measles is caused by a virus, there isn't actually a specific medical treatment for the problem. The virus simply has to run its course and the body needs to be given the chance to fight off the infection. A doctor will be able to diagnose and advise you but ultimately cannot provide treatment. People who have the infection are suggested to receive plenty of fluids and rest a lot, and of course stay away from other people to avoid the infection spreading.

If you believe you are suffering from measles then see your doctor for an accurate diagnosis. They will be able to discuss with you your options and the best way to help the virus run its course much more quickly than it normally might.
Katie Harry Profile
Katie Harry answered
Measles is a viral infection which is highly contagious and used to be very common in the UK but now has been reduces through immunization. It is easy to identify because the rash of measles is very distinctive. Measles can be transmitted to another person quickly and easily. This happens when a person suffering from measles sneezes or coughs. Anyone who has not been immunized or has never has measles can become infected. You can find the illustration and more information here.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Can you still catch measles after having the measles, months and rubella vaccination
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
It's a rah that you get on your body there's way of curing it by using ointments or you should get your shot before you are over the age of 4 then you won't have to worry about it.
wilbert u can call me sue Profile
They are little red dots that will appear on face or and as well on body. Do not scratch and use baking soda in water to relieve itching

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